First try of casting with plaster

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According to the bible of Forensic Evidence I’ve tried to carefully follow the instructions to create my very first casting with plaster, mixing it with water, pouring it gently into the footwear and waiting for 15 minutes.

Well as you can see it is not perfect, but practice makes perfect! I will do it for sure any time I’ll get the chance, trying with animal tracks as well.

 

The Richardson Case, 1786

One of the first cases with footwear evidence presented in Court was the Richardson case from Kirkcudbright, Scotland in 1786.

The case depicted the fatal stabbing of a young woman.

As we can read in the deposition, the investigator tracked the footprints that actually left the scene: the perpetrator’s shoes appeared to be “heavily nailed and patched”. Tracings were made of these impressions and later the shoes of Richardson were identified as the source.

The words at the top “1st October, 1786 measure of the print of the foot of the person who murdered Elizabeth Hughan.” “2 October 1786 applied to William Richardson’s foot and fits it exactly. That is it fits the sole of the shoe. The nicks agreeing exactly with the heel.”

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Photo taken from “Forensic Footwear Evidence”, William J. Bodziak.

Forensic Tracking.

“[…] Footwear and tire track evidence can be essential to your case, but it’s often overlooked. In some cases, CSIs identify the evidence but assume they can’t do anything with it. Weather extremes and difficult surfaces can make casting very challenging, but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible. In this two part series, I’ll first review the basics of casting footwear and tire track evidence. Then in the next issue, I’ll provide an overview of techniques you can use in more difficult situations […]

Taken from Dick Warrington extract in FORENSICMAG.